Introduction to Applied Sociology

Introduction to Applied Sociology

Here’s a brief visual overview about how sociology is used beyond universities. Applied sociology is the use of sociological concepts and methods to answer specific client questions and to address community concerns. This video covers: what is sociology? What sorts of questions and problems can applied sociology address? What type of work do applied sociologists do?

 

Sociology Careers in High Demand

Sociology Careers in High Demand

In 2011, Career  Cast ranked the job of sociologist 11th amongst all professions in the USA, based on Department of Labour measures of work environment, stress and hiring outlook. In 2013, The Wall Street Journal announced that sociology was in 19th place in its list of best jobs. They drew on data by the USA Bureau of Labour focusing on five measures: “physical demands, work environment, income, stress, and hiring outlook.”

Sociology skills remain in high demand in government, the not-for-profit sector and in the corporate world.
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Foucault and Chomsky Debate Human Nature

Foucault and Chomsky Debate Human Nature

What is our role in social justice as applied sociologists? In this great debate from 1971, Michel Foucault and Noam Chomsky disagree about the fundamental qualities of “human nature” and the key task of social science in helping humanity achieve its collective potential. Chomsky believes that the social sciences should draw up a framework for an ideal society where creativity, freedom and scientific discovery will flourish. He sees it is our task to help to put this plan into action.

Foucault argues that there is no ideal concept of social justice that can be universally applied. Instead, he sees that social scientists are tasked with critiquing social institutions and relations of power in different societies.

Interestingly, Foucault’s perspective reflects academic sociology (with an emphasis on critique of social institutions), while Chomsky’s argument is closer to applied sociology! Applied sociologists work with policy and community organisations to affect justice organisations and practices.

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A Sociology for Women

A Sociology for Women

Dorothy Smith helped to revolutionise sociological methods through feminist principles:

“A sociology for women would offer a knowledge of the social organisation & determinations of the properties & events of our directly experienced world.”

Smith helped pioneer feminist standpoint theory. She was writing at a time when sociology was dominated by positivist methods. Positivism describes the belief that sociology should mimic the scientific practices of the natural sciences. Central to this was the idea of objectivity as defined by detachment from the groups we studied.

Counter to this perspective Smith argues that sociologists needed to acknowledge that we bring our lifetime of social experiences into the field. She notes that our participants react to us in the same way: as gendered beings. While gender inequality is now central to our discipline this was not the case in the late-1980s when Smith was writing. Smith argued that sociology marginalised women’s knowledge. She advocated for qualitative research methods including interviews and ethnography that recognise and draw on women’s socialisation and their everyday experiences of domination.

A sociology for women - Dorothy Smith
A sociology for women – Dorothy Smith
The Insight of Karl Marx

The Insight of Karl Marx

The insight of Karl Marx is as useful today as it was 100 years ago." - Nouriel Roubini at the World Economic Forum
The insight of Karl Marx

 

“… Inequality is rising. This is not just a ‘moral’ issue but also an issue of too little consumption too little savings that is bad for global growth. It’s a bit like the Marxist idea that if profits grow too much compared to wages, there’s not going to be enough consumption, and capitalism is going to self destruct. The insight of Karl Marx is as useful today as it was 100 years ago.” – Nouriel Roubini at the World Economic Forum.